Classic Lifts: Faults and Corrections

Classic Lifts Faults and Corrections

Snatch

·         Fault:

The Lifter loses the bar in front in the receiving position.

·         Possible Cause:

o   Incomplete pull

o   The lifter pulls himself under the bar before the explosion phase

 

·         Corrections:

o   Reinforce technique. Perform snatches from different positions (high hang, above the knee, below the knee, from blocks).

o   Tell the athlete to finish the pull. Have the athlete focus on turning the wrists over quickly and pushing up against the barbell. 

o   Snatch balances are also recommended.

 

·         Fault:

The lifter swings the bar during the Pull.

·         Possible Cause:

o   The lifter throws the head and shoulders back at the top of the pull, trying for greater extension. This action causes the reactions of the bar swinging away.

o   The lifter drives up on the toes too early then using the hips to generate more force, which causes the bar to swing.

o   The lifter allows the elbows to rotate back and the bar swings away during the explosion phase.

 

·         Corrections:

o   Reinforce Technique

o   Combination work with blocks (both above and below the knee).  2 Pulls + Power Snatch + Overhead Squat.

o   Emphasize that the lifter should finish the pull in a vertical position.  From the blocks remind the lifter that they should deep their shoulders over the bar longer, which will assist in staying on flat feet for a longer period.  The overhead squat will remind the lifter to push up against the bar ell during the decent under the bar.

o   Snatch with feet in receiving position. Have the lifter put their feet in their receiving position when starting the movement.  They may rise up on the balls of the feet but they should not lose contact with the ground.  This will make the barbell move much slower forcing the lifter to stay flat footed longer and hold their levers longer. 

o   When the bar makes contact on the thigh the athlete now extends the torso and actively pulls under the bar. The bar stays closer and allows the athlete to push up more efficiently.

 

·         Fault:

The lifter sits back from the bar at the start and maintains this throughout the pull.

 

·         Possible Cause:

o   The lifter’s hip is too low in the start position causing the weight distribution to be too far toward the heels, which results in the lifter being in a poor position to produce force throughout the pull position.

 

·         Corrections:

o   Change the start position. Shift the athlete forward so the weight distribution is in the middle of the foot. Which results in the lifter being in a poor position to produce force throughout the pull position.

o   Stop Snatches. Once the athlete is in their adjusted start position they pull the barbell off the floor until it is at mid shin.  The athlete then holds the bar motionless for a 1 count and then performs the snatch.  This stopping of the barbell will force the lifter to both be in a flat footed stance and hold the body lever.

o   Perform Snatches from low blocks. Setting the block at mid shin the athlete performs snatches from this position.  Combination lifts 2 Pulls + Snatch will also re-enforce staying flat footed and holding the body levers in the correct position.

 

·         Fault:

During the Lift off, the lifter actively pulls the bar back instead of push the knees back

 

·         Possible Cause:

o   Many novice athletes are excited or are psyched up for the lift and this emotion results.

o   Another cause may be a lock of strength in the lift off position. To overcome this deficit, athletes develop a pendulum effect in which they intentionally develop momentum from lift off by rolling the bar back toward them, then using this momentum to aid in the lift.  This lack of strength results in the bar swinging out and forward as the lifter extends the hip.

 

·         Corrections:

o   Coaches must convince the lifter to channel their emotions in a positive way.  Coaches can work with athletes in training to develop an appropriate and efficient start position. Athletes must improve general core strength.

o   Snatches without moving the feet, feet in the receiving position, snatches with an eccentric slide to the below the knee position.  Snatches from the low block position.  These movements will strengthen the body levers and allow the athlete to smooth out the initial pull from the floor.  Remind the athlete that slow is smooth, and smooth is fast.

 

·         Fault:

The lifter jumps back or away from the barbell after the second pull.

 

·         Possible Cause:

o   The lifter finishes the second pull beyond 180 degrees because they hold on to the barbell too long to try really finish the pull.

o   The athlete does not stay over the barbell throughout the pull.

o   The athlete swings the barbell.

 

·         Corrections:

o   Convince the athlete to finish the pull in a vertical position.  In addition, help the athlete understand when to pull their selves under the bar at the appropriate time.  Keeping the shoulders over the bar will also help in assuring a proper receiving position.  The athlete will not try to over pull to overcome leverage issues when the shoulders stay over the bar.  The athlete will also reduce bar displacement due to a more vertical bar trajectory.

o   Exercises that will ensure a more vertical pull position are pulls, shrugs and lifts from different positions, as well as combination movements

 

·         Fault:

The lifter loses the bar behind.

 

·         Possible Cause:

o   Throwing the head and shoulders back not finishing the pull in a vertical position

o   Swinging the bar away from the body

o   The athlete not keeping his shoulders over the bar

o   Poor receiving position

o   Lack of general strength in the low squat position

 

·         Corrections:

o   The first two bullet points outline the two primary reasons a lifter may lose the bar behind.  Throwing the head and shoulders back creates an effect on the bar. This effect is the bar moving away from the body.

o   The coach can correct the first two points by emphasizing to the athlete to finish in the vertical position and to choose a focal point to prevent him from throwing the head back.  By keeping the elbows out and above the bar, especially during the second pull, and stressing arm speed, the athlete will keep the bar close to his body.

o   To improve the receiving position, the athlete must first develop confidence in this position. Some exercises to improve confidence are higher intensity overhead squats, snatch balance, drop snatches and snatch grip push press or power jerk behind the neck plus overhead squat.  Speed and meeting the bar in the low position with these higher intensity weights will develop confidence.

 

·         Fault:

The lifter presses out the snatch in the receiving position.

 

·         Possible Cause:

o   The lifter does not impart enough force at the finish of the pull

o   The lifter is low in moving under the bar

o   Weakness in the receiving position

 

·         Corrections:

o   If the athlete does not apply enough force or does not give sufficient energy for developing maximal momentum, the lift may result in a press out.  This insufficient force application will most likely result in the lifter being slow in moving under the bar and into the receiving position.  If the athlete has weakness in the low receiving position, it will only exacerbate the problem.

o   Exercises, which emphasize the pull and force application, are pulls, shrugs, and lifts from different positions, particularly from the blocks as well as 3 stage snatches (snatch form high hang, above the knee, below the knee).  Snatch grip push presses as well as presses from the receiving position of the snatch (sots presses).

Clean

·         Fault:

The athletes elbow touches the knee or thigh and the athlete does not meet the bar properly in the receiving position.

 

·         Possible Cause:

o   Incomplete pull, the lifter moves under the bar too early.

o   The lifter does not meet the bar properly in the receiving position.

o   The lifter bends the arms too early

o   The lifter shifts the knees forward, or goes on the toes too soon

o   The lifter jumps back too far in the receiving position

 

·         Corrections:

o   If the lifter rushes the pull and moves under the bar without full extension, therefore limiting force production, this infraction may occur.  This technical flaw may also lead to another fault.  If the lifter does not meet the bar well, it may crash on them.  This resulting crash may force the upper body and elbow forward with a knee touch ensuring. 

o   Should the lifter bend the arms too early limited force production will be the consequence. The lifter may bend the arms to reinforce his belief of really finishing the pull, the opposite will occur. The lifters power source which he wil use to pull himself under the bar, will be limited.

o   Also if the lifter does not stay over the bar long enough or pushes the knees forward too soon, this will affect power output as well.

o   A result that may happen is if the lifter jumps back too far. Usually if the lifter throws the head and shoulders back, this will result. Once the action occurs there must be a reaction, which is the lifter jumping back to receive the bar.  The lifter will receive it in a poor position with the bar crashing on him resulting in an elbow tough.

o   Exercises which will assist the lifter with finishing the pull are shrugs, pulls lifts from different positions and back strengthening exercises such as good mornings, hyperextensions and reverse hypers.  These exercises will also remedy arm pulling.  During these exercises, the coach should reinforce correct arm position. When performing front squats remind the lifter to push up against the bar when the accent begins.

 

·         Fault:

The lifter jumps forward during the clean.

 

·         Possible Cause:

o   Poor start position

o   The barbell moves away from the lifter at lift off

o   Incomplete extension during the pull

o   Poor core strength

 

·         Corrections:

o   If the lifter is in a poor start position, there is a great chance for him to miss the lift. The weight distribution should be toward the center of the foot or toward the heels.  Poor chest and hip positions, will likewise adversely affect the lift. During lift off the barbell should immediately move back toward the lifter. If the lifter allows the weight to control them, it will most likely move forward.  This means the lifter will be on their toes almost from the lift off.  If the action were that the weight distribution is on the toes, the reaction would be for the lifter to jump ward to catch up to the weight.  This poor position will also affect the pull.  By being so far forward, the lifter is not able to finish the pull.  This makes the problem worse.  Many times the athletes are not physically prepared to lift heavy weights and the lifter must address fundamental core strength.

o   Stop cleans, lifter pulls barbell to mid shin position, holds for a 1 count and then performs the clean.  Since this movement forces the lifter to hold their levers it is a good strength exercise as well.

·         Fault:

Excessive Foot Stomp.

 

·         Possible Cause:

o   Weight is too far forward from the start of the lift. Lifter is overly anxious or aggressive.

 

·         Corrections:

o   Excessive foot stomp is not effective.  It can lead to the barbell crashing onto the lifter.  It slows the turnover of the barbell and hampers the timing of the lifter to push up against the barbell.

o   Snatch ad Clean with the feet already in the receiving position. This will slow the barbell forcing the lifter to hold their levers, keep the barbell close to the body and push up against the bar.

o   Snatches and Cleans onto low Blocks. Actually these low blocks are merely 18” square pieces of ¾’ plywood.  Place the plywood pieces to either side of the athlete’s feet. In their normal start position.  The lifter then performs either a snatch or a clean and lands their feet onto the plywood.  The fact that the plywood is ¾’ higher forces the lifter to really react the feet hitting the platform quickly.  This makes the lifter pull under and push up faster than they typically do. It gets them to their feet back onto the platform quickly and efficiently and reduces the foot stomp.

Jerk

·         Fault:

The lifter loses the lift forward either in the receiving position or during the recovery.

 

·         Possible Cause:

o   The dip is forward due to incorrect weight distribution

o   The athlete allows the chest or elbows to drop during the dip

o   The dip and or drive is incomplete

o   The athlete steps away from the bar during the split

o   The athlete pushes the head forward during the pull

 

·         Corrections:

o   The weight distribution during the dip should be on the heels. Should the weight be on the toes, as a result the lifter will thrust the bar forward.  If, during the dip, the athlete lets the elbows or chest drop, this will not only compromise the rack position, but it will also affect force production.  Decreasing the amount of watts produced during the drive.

o   If the dip of the athlete is premature or incomplete, the athlete will have a much more difficult time making the jerk.  This incomplete drive may cause the lifter to step away from the attempt during the split.  Another way a lifter can miss a lift forward is due to pushing the head forward in the receiving position.

o   The action of pushing the head forward leads to the reaction of the hips moving backward and the chest forward, this puts the lifter in a compromising position

o   Exercises to assist with proper weight distribution, with keeping the chest and elbows in the proper position and correct dip and drive skill are technique reinforcement, rack jerks, power jerks, behind the neck jerks, press in split.  Lifter assumes the split position and holding the barbell on the shoulders performs presses. This teaches the lifter to push up and lock out the elbows.

o   Split cleans from Blocks.  As strange as this sounds this Clean exercise has shown solid results in improving an athlete’s Jerk.

o   Placing the barbell on a block that is just below the knee the athlete performs power split cleans.  The athlete needs to focus on keeping the torso upright when receiving the barbell and stepping through with the lead leg.  The back leg moves to its correct position as well.  The reason the lift being performed from the blocks is that the bar is in a high enough position that the lifter can focus on the stepping through phase that is related to the Jerk and no on the pull phase related to the clean.

 ·         Fault:

The Jerk is lost behind in the receiving position or in the recovery.

 ·         Possible Cause:

o   Incorrect dip and drive, the lifter throws his hips forward as he drives up

o   The lifter steps too far through with the leading leg in the jerk

o   The lifter steps back too far or too aggressively with the leading leg in recovering

 

·         Corrections:

o   The dip and drive should be as vertical as possible.  If the lifter throws the hips forward or allows the chest to deflate, this will affect bar trajectory negatively.  Also affecting the jerk adversely is if the lifter steps too far through with the leading leg. This will not only put the lifter at a disadvantage for recovering but also with stability.  If the lifter steps back too aggressively with the lead leg while recovering, this may lead to stability issues due to the momentum created by the front leg.

o   Any overhead strength, stability or technical exercise will assist with these issues. Any type of pressing movement, power jerk, jerk from the rack or blocks, jerk from behind the neck, jerk balance, jerk recoveries.

 ·         Fault:

The lifter presses out of the Jerk

 

·         Possible Cause:

o   Poor or weak dip and drive

o   The lifter tries to push the bar with the arms during the drive

o   Immobility of the shoulder girdle

o   Poor arm lockout

 

·         Corrections:

o   If the athlete has a poor dip and drive, the result may be lifter pressing out the Jerk.  To compensate for the poor dip and drive, the lifter may try to muscle up the weight.  Here the lifter actively pushes up with the arms to try to get to the finishing position.  Poor shoulder flexibility in the shoulder girdle may also affect the Jerk adversely.  Lifters must have a good lockout or finishing position.  Lifters can be successful with a below average arm lockout however; they must be diligent in their accessory training to not lose a lift due to a poor arm lock.

o   To prevent a poor dip and drive, athletes can due to variety of exercises including push press and power jerks from in front and behind the neck on the rack or blocks, jerk dips and jerk drives from the blocks. Split cleans from the blocks as well.

o   View the lift from different angles as the coach may notice some faults at different areas around the gym. Novice coaches may try several corrections at first and se which exercises work best with each athlete. This will give the coach a better understanding of the different exercises.

o   Split cleans from blocks, has shown great results in improving the split jerk

o   Placing the barbell on a block that is just below the knee the athlete performs power split cleans, the athlete needs to focus on keeping the torso upright when receiving the barbell and stepping through with the lead leg.  The back leg moves to its correct position as well.  The reason the lift being performed from the blocks is that the bar is in a high enough position that the lifter can focus on the stepping through phase that is related to the jerk and not on the pull phase related to the clean. 

 

 

 

tyler reiter